The 1930s - Censorship

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Over the decades the New was opposed to all kinds of covert and overt censorship. The New York Times carried a story on the banning of Till the Day I Die in 1936:

“Australia Versus Odets. Protecting the people is quite an industry here where there are more books banned than anywhere else in the world save possibly the Irish Free State”.

At that time over 5000 books were officially listed in Australia as prohibited publications. A supporter of the Book Censorship Abolition League, the NTL in 1937 staged the Writers’ Association’s winning sketches The Deputation Waits and Nellie Rickie’s The Censor:

Miss Chizzlewitt (turning pages of Bible): I’ll find you a snappy story. Here. Read the one about Lot’s wife.

Censor (takes Bible): Where is my magnifying glass?

Miss Chizzlewitt: You had it with you when you went to view the statue of Apollo at the Fountain. Oh, here it is.

Censor (reads Bible): Oh. Oh. Oh. (Faints)

Miss Chizzlewitt: Help! Help! The Censor has fainted. Here is your smelling salts.

Censor (shrieks): Salt. Salts. Take it away. I never want to hear of salt again. We must censor that book.

Miss Chizzlewitt: Censor the Bible?

Censor: It can’t go out with stuff like that in it.

For the banning of Till The Day I Die see The 1930s - The Threat of Fascism.


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